Ferdâ Asya, Professor of English

Ferdâ Asya, Professor of English


Bakeless Center

Ferdâ Asya, Ph.D.

Ferdâ Asya

111A Bakeless Center
fasya@bloomu.edu
Office: 570-389-4433
Fax: 570-389-3006

Office Hours (Fall 2017)
» MW 1:00-2:30 p.m.
» T/Th 12:30-1:30 p.m.

Ferdâ Asya received her PhD in American Literature from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. She has Masters degrees in English Literature from both Indiana University and Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Her Bachelors degree in English Language and Literature is from Hacettepe University in Ankara Turkey.

Teaching and Research Interests

Ferdâ Asya started her graduate studies in English and American literature on a Fulbright Scholarship at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. She lived in France, Nigeria, and Turkey; taught English and American literature and French language in Canada and Malaysia; and traveled extensively in northern and western Europe.

Ferdâ Asya works in the fields of nineteenth-and twentieth-century American literature, with an emphasis on the turn of the century, the era of realism, naturalism, and early modernism. More particularly, she is interested in the social and political approaches to the fiction of this period. Her other academic interests include multiethnic literature, international literature, and literature of the Holocaust.

She has articles published and papers presented at national and international conferences on the works of Edith Wharton, Willa Cather, Djuna Barnes, Gertrude Stein, Nella Larsen, Diane Johnson, Achy Obejas, Ana Castillo, Rosario Morales, Meyer Levin, Tillie Olsen, Allegra Goodman, Lore Segal, Chinua Achebe, Leslie Marmon Silko, Prosper Mérimée, Anna de Noailles and Marge Piercy. Her most recent publications include book chapters on Charlotte Delbo, Walter Winter, and Aurora Levins Morales. Her current research focuses on the political aspects of the fiction of Edith Wharton and American expatriate writers in Paris.

Courses Taught

  • American Literature 2 (Survey of American Literature from 1865 to the Present)
  • Feminist Reading of Culture (“Literature by Anglophone Women Writers from Early Twentieth Century to the Present,” “Transcultural Identities in Fiction by Women”)
  • Introduction to Literature (“Literature of North America and Other Parts of the World,” “Self-Discovery and Cultural Models of Identity”)
  • Literature and Society (“Fictional Representations of American Women in Europe,” “Identity, Dislocation, and Belonging in Fiction by Contemporary Women Writers,” “Literature of Growing Up,” “The Portrayal of Women by Realists in American Literature,” Self-Discovery and Identity in Fiction by Women Writers”)
  • Special Topics (“American Expatriate Fiction in Paris”)

Scholarship 2017

May — Asya, Ph.D., presented a paper, titled “From Wharton to White: Paris in Focus and Flux in Expatriate Writing,” at the American Literature Association (ALA) Annual Conference in Boston, Massachusetts, on 28 May 2017. The American Literature Association is committed to exploring the richness and diversity of American writing and welcomes all forms of scholarship. It is not limited to any specific critical methodology or dogma.

Scholarship 2016

August — Asya, Ph.D., published a chapter, , titled “Motifs of Anarchism in Edith Wharton’s The Children,” in Edith Wharton and Cosmopolitanism. Ed. Merdith L. Goldsmith and Emily J. Orlando. Gainesville: UP of Florida, 2016. 38-61. Print.

In this chapter, she explored Edith Wharton’s enactment of the removal of her childhood repressions in The Children, a novel of expatriate children banding together in anarchist solidarity against their ineffectual parents, by implementing the unique theory of transatlantic anarchism that allows the coexistence of the two irreconcilable veins of anarchism, the collectivist Darwinian-Kropotkinian and the individualist Nietzschean-Stirneresque, and Ernst Bloch’s definition of utopia based on his notion of Not-Yet-Conscious, derived from Sigmund Freud’s theories of the unconscious and dreams.

July — Asya, Ph.D., published a chapter, titled “Motifs of Anarchism in Edith Wharton’s The Children,” in Edith Wharton and Cosmopolitanism. Ed. Merdith L. Goldsmith and Emily J. Orlando. Gainesville: UP of Florida, 2016. 38-61. Print. In this chapter, Asya explores Edith Wharton’s enactment of the removal of her childhood repressions in The Children, a novel of expatriate children banding together in anarchist solidarity against their ineffectual parents, by implementing the unique theory of transatlantic anarchism that allows the coexistence of the two irreconcilable veins of anarchism, the collectivist Darwinian-Kropotkinian and the individualist Nietzschean-Stirneresque, and Ernst Bloch’s definition of utopia based on his notion of Not-Yet-Conscious, derived from Sigmund Freud’s theories of the unconscious and dreams.

July — Asya, Ph.D., presented a refereed paper, titled “‘What’s Love Got to Do with It': Wharton’s Fascination with Fullerton,” at the “Wharton in Washington 2016 Conference” in Washington DC on June 3. This is an international conference organized by The Edith Wharton Society.

Scholarship 2015

May — Asya, Ph.D., presented a refereed paper, “Return Trip of Culture: Morocco/France/Morocco,” in the “Edith Wharton Society Panel,” at the American Literature Association (ALA) Annual Conference in Boston, Massachusetts.

February — Asya, Ph.D., had her review of Diane Johnson’s Flyover Lives: A Memoir recently published in the American Studies Journal. 53.3 (Summer 2014): 88-89. Print.

The American Studies Journal is a peer-reviewed open-access journal that provides a forum for intellectual debate about all aspects of social, cultural, and political life in the United States. It aims to present new and challenging research in the humanities to both academic and a non-academic audiences around the world.

Scholarship 2014

October — Asya, Ph.D., edited and published a book of essays, American Writers in Europe: 1850 to the Present. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

American Writers in Europe: 1850 to the Present

The chapters on the works of Nathaniel Parker Willis, E.D.E.N. Southworth, Gertrude Atherton, John Cournos, Edith Wharton, Muriel Rukeyser, Langston Hughes, Edwin Rolfe, John Ashbery, Adrienne Rich, Richard Wilbur, Allen Ginsberg, Harriet Welty Rochefort, and Suzy Gershman, explore the impartial critical outlook that American writers acquired in different parts of Europe, from 1850 to the present, and used as a lens to view Europe and America.

Focusing on some less familiar writers, they reveal intriguing aspects of the lives and works of American writers than those of the customarily anthologized expatriates. Offering a broad range of American experiences in Europe in an extensive span of time, the book widens the history of the transatlantic cultural and literary dialogue between America and Europe.

October — Asya, Ph.D., presented a refereed paper, “Lyautey in Wharton’s Morocco,” in the “Edith Wharton Society Panel,” at the Modern Language Association (MLA) Annual Conference, in Chicago, Illinois, on 12 January 2014.

Scholarship 2013

May — Asya, Ph.D., presented a refereed paper, “Contexts Engendering Texts: Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence and Francesca Segal’s The Innocents,” in the “Edith Wharton Society Panel,” at the American Literature Association (ALA) Annual Conference, in Boston, Massachusetts, on May 24.

May — Asya, Ph.D., also organized and chaired a panel, “American Poets in Europe,” at the American Literature Association (ALA) Annual Conference, in Boston, Massachusetts, on May 24.

April — Asya, Ph.D., gave a lecture, “Location and Dislocation: Edith Wharton’s Transatlantic Homes and Hospitality” for the Institute for Culture and Society (ICS) Lecture Series, College of Liberal Arts, Bloomsburg University, on April 18.

Scholarship 2012

July — Asya, Ph.D., published a chapter, “The Orientalism of Anna de Noaille,” in Paris-Bucharest, Bucharest-Paris: Francophone Writers from Romania. Ed. Anne Quinney. New York: Rodopi, 2012. 37-70. Print.

In this chapter, Asya examines nine volumes of poetry and three novels of Anna de Noailles (1876-1933), one of the most accomplished, prolific, and charismatic writers of France, in her almost forty-year career. The chapter depicts that Sufi convictions, which equipped Anna de Noailles with a mystic perspective, resulted from her familiarity with the eastern tradition and lifestyle of her family. Her unique use of poetic clichés such as heart, love, and death in her entire oeuvre as tropes to enact such fundamental notions of Sufi mysticism as gnosis, annihilation of the self, annihilation in the friend, and die before you die reveals her profound perception of Sufi beliefs and evokes a unique mystic literary milieu through which she envisioned not only her art but also her life and relationships.

June — Asya, Ph.D., presented a refereed paper, “No Fear of the Threshold: Edith Wharton’s Transatlantic Anarchist Children,” at the “Edith Wharton in Florence 2012,” Edith Wharton Society Conference, in Florence, Italy, on June 6.

Scholarship 2011

May — Asya, Ph.D., presented a refereed paper, “Unfolding Anarchism in Istanbul: James Baldwin’s Another Country”; organized a panel, “American Writers in Europe”; and chaired a session, “The Places of Contemporary Literature,” at the Annual Conference of American Literature Association (ALA) on May 26 to 29 in Boston.

May — Asya, Ph.D., presented a refereed paper, “Unfolding Anarchism in Istanbul: James Baldwin’s Another Country,” at the American Literature Association (ALA) Annual Conference, in Boston, Massachusetts, on May 29.

May — Asya, Ph.D., also organized and chaired a panel, “American Writers in Europe,” at the American Literature Association (ALA) Annual Conference, in Boston, Massachusetts, on May 28.

July — Asya, Ph.D., chaired a panel, “The Places of Contemporary Literature,” at the American Literature Association (ALA) Annual Conference, in Boston, Massachusetts, on May 28.

Scholarship 2010

February — Asya, Ph.D., presented, “The Fulfillment of the Anarchist Wish: A Freudian Reading of Utopia in Marge Piercy’s Woman on the Edge of Time," and chaired a panel at The Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, international conference held at the University of Louisville on Feb. 18 to 20.

Scholarship 2009

May — Asya, Ph.D., presented a paper, "An Expatriate Coup d'Oeil at World Events in Edith Wharton's In Morocco and Diane Johnson's Lulu in Marrakech," and chaired two conference panels, "Women and Ghosts" and "Gender Issues and Contemporary Fiction," at the 20th Annual Conference of American Literature Association in Boston, Mass., held in May.

Scholarship 2008

March — Asya, Ph.D., is the winner of the 2008/2009 Edith Wharton Collection Research Award granted by the Edith Wharton Society to conduct research on the Edith Wharton materials at the Beinecke Library of Yale University. The Edith Wharton Collection at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library contains 50,000 items, consisting of manuscripts, letters, photographs, miscellaneous personal papers that belonged to Edith Wharton (1862-1937) and were a part of her estate at her death. The Edith Wharton Collection Research Award is a competitive grant. It is offered each year by the Edith Wharton Society to one scholar for bringing a thorough preparation to the research project, which will contribute significantly to Wharton Scholarship.

June — Asya, Ph.D., presented a paper titled, "The Darwin Connection: A Kropotkinian Reading of Edith Wharton's The Age of Innocence," at the Edith Wharton and History Conference of the Edith Wharton Society on June 26, 2008 in Pittsfield, Mass.

Her essay, "Anarchism in the Work of Aurora Levins Morales," appeared in the volume, Writing Off the Hyphen: New Critical Perspectives on the Literature of the Puerto Rican Diaspora (American Ethnic and Cultural Studies), published by University of Washington Press in May 2008. In the essay, she employs a threefold theoretical approach to discern the individualist, collectivist, and ecological ideology of anarchism as an important element in the artistic creativity of Aurora Levins Morales.

October — Ferda Asya, Ph.D., presented a paper, "Anarcho-Feminism in the Work of Aurora Levins Morales," at the Puerto Rican Studies Association Conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on October 3. Her essay, "Unveiling the Origin of the Romani Holocaust: The Anarchist Tradition in Winter Time by Walter Winter," appeared as a chapter in "Gypsies" in European Literature and Culture: Studies in European Culture and History, published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2008. This volume, which contains essays by internationally distinguished scholars of Romani Studies, is edited by Valentina Glajar and Domnica Radulescu, renowned scholars in this field.

December — Asya, Ph.D., presented a paper, "Love and Death in the Work of Anna de Noailles," at the Annual Convention of Modern Language Association (MLA) in Chicago, IL, on Dec. 30.